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Advair

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Most Commonly Used

Advair Diskus 250mcg-50mcg
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Advair Diskus 100mcg-50mcg
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Advair Diskus 500mcg-50mcg
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Advair Diskus 250mcg-50mcg
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Advair Diskus 100mcg-50mcg
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Also See:

  • Answers to Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Other Class Related Drugs
  • Additional Patient Usage Statistics


Overview Information on Advair

Pharmacist Tip
Take Advair as prescribed even if you do not have any symptoms. Asthma is unpredictable and symptoms may come back.     
Advair® is a combination of inhaled medicines prescribed to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Advair contains fluticasone, a steroid that lowers inflammation, and salmeterol, a bronchodilator that relaxes muscles in the airways.

Doctors prescribe Advair to prevent asthma attacks and keep COPD, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, from flaring up or getting worse.

Accumulation of mucus, spasm of muscles surrounding the airways, and swelling of the airways can narrow the airways and make it difficult to breathe. This leads to symptoms such as shortness of breath, cough, congestion, and wheezing. The fluticasone in Advair reduces the swelling and salmeterol relaxes the muscles, making it easier to breathe.

Advair does not treat sudden, severe asthma or COPD symptoms. It is not a replacement for a rescue inhaler. Advair is meant to be used when a long-term asthma control medicine does not work well enough. Your doctor may tell you to stop using Advair if your asthma becomes well controlled.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Advair® is a combination of inhaled medicines prescribed to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Advair contains fluticasone, a steroid that lowers inflammation, and salmeterol, a bronchodilator that relaxes muscles in the airways.

Doctors prescribe Advair to prevent asthma attacks and keep COPD, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, from flaring up or getting worse.

Accumulation of mucus, spasm of muscles surrounding the airways, and swelling of the airways can narrow the airways and make it difficult to breathe. This leads to symptoms such as shortness of breath, cough, congestion, and wheezing. The fluticasone in Advair reduces the swelling and salmeterol relaxes the muscles, making it easier to breathe.

Advair does not treat sudden, severe asthma or COPD symptoms. It is not a replacement for a rescue inhaler. Advair is meant to be used when a long-term asthma control medicine does not work well enough. Your doctor may tell you to stop using Advair if your asthma becomes well controlled.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013