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Aspirin

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Most Commonly Used

Aspirin 81mg EC Tab
Rugby Laboratories a Division of The Harvard Drug Group, LLC
Pill Identification: LOGO 
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Aspirin 81mg Chw Tab
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Aspirin 325mg EC Tab
Rugby Laboratories a Division of The Harvard Drug Group, LLC
Pill Identification:
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Aspirin 81mg Chw Tab
Rugby Laboratories a Division of The Harvard Drug Group, LLC
Pill Identification: L467 
Drug Image
Aspirin 81mg Chw Tab
Major Pharmaceuticals Inc, a Harvard Drug Group Company
Pill Identification: L467 
Drug Image
Aspirin 81mg Chw Tab
Major Pharmaceuticals Inc, a Harvard Drug Group Company
Pill Identification: L467 
Drug Image

Also See:

  • Answers to Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Other Class Related Drugs
  • Additional Patient Usage Statistics


Overview Information on Aspirin

Pharmacist Tip
Aspirin can affect the way prescription medicines work. Always tell your doctor that you are taking aspirin so the doctor can make sure it is okay to take with all your other medicines.     
Aspirin treats fever, pain, and inflammation. Aspirin comes in prescription and over-the-counter strengths.

Your doctor may tell you to take a low-dose aspirin on a regular basis to prevent a heart attack or stroke because aspirin prevents blood from clotting. Not everyone should take aspirin, so make sure you talk with your doctor before you start taking aspirin.

Children and teenagers should not take aspirin even if they have flu symptoms or the chickenpox. There is a rare but very serious condition called Reye's syndrome that could happen.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Aspirin treats fever, pain, and inflammation. Aspirin comes in prescription and over-the-counter strengths.

Your doctor may tell you to take a low-dose aspirin on a regular basis to prevent a heart attack or stroke because aspirin prevents blood from clotting. Not everyone should take aspirin, so make sure you talk with your doctor before you start taking aspirin.

Children and teenagers should not take aspirin even if they have flu symptoms or the chickenpox. There is a rare but very serious condition called Reye's syndrome that could happen.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013