Amitriptyline Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Amitriptyline

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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_11664.JPG
Amitriptyline 10mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M 77 
Drug Image file DrugItem_11665.JPG
Amitriptyline 50mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M 36 
Drug Image file DrugItem_11663.JPG
Amitriptyline 25mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M 51 
Drug Image file DrugItem_6072.JPG
Amitriptyline 100mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M 38 
Drug Image file DrugItem_4412.JPG
Amitriptyline 75mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M 37 
Overview Information on Amitriptyline
Pharmacist Tip
Amitriptyline may cause drowsiness or dizziness. Do not drive or operate machinery until you know how it affects you.     
Amitriptyline is a type of prescription medicine called a tricyclic antidepressant. Amitriptyline is used to treat symptoms of depression. The way amitriptyline works is not yet completely understood. However, it is thought that amitriptyline works by increasing levels of certain chemicals in the brain needed to maintain a balanced mood.

It is not recommended that children younger than age 12 take amitriptyline.

Amitriptyline comes in tablet form. Your doctor will tell you how often you should take amitriptyline. Do not take more or fewer doses of amitriptyline than the doctor prescribes. It is suggested that you take your amitriptyline at around the same time(s) every day.

If you miss a dose of amitriptyline, take it as soon as you can. If it's almost time for your next dose of amitriptyline, skip your missed dose and take your next dose of amitriptyline at the regular time.

Store amitriptyline at room temperature.

It may take a few weeks or longer before you fully feel the benefits of amitriptyline. Your doctor may start you on a low dose of amitriptyline and gradually increase it to find the dose of amitriptyline that works best for you.

It is suggested that you do not suddenly stop taking amitriptyline. This may cause withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, headache, and lack of energy. Your doctor will work with you to gradually decrease your dose of amitriptyline.

It is very important for you to call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms or if they are new, getting worse, or are worrying you:
  • New or worse depression
  • Thoughts about suicide or dying, attempts to commit suicide
  • New or worse anxiety
  • Feeling very agitated or restless
  • Panic attacks
  • Trouble sleeping
  • New or worse irritability
  • Acting aggressive, being angry or violent
  • Acting on dangerous impulses
  • An extreme increase in activity and talking
  • Other unusual changes in behavior or mood
Other medical problems may affect how your doctor will want you to take amitriptyline. Tell your doctor about all of your health problems. It is also important to tell your doctor about any medicines, herbal supplements, or vitamins you are taking before you take amitriptyline. You will want to tell your doctor if you are allergic to any medicines before you take amitriptyline.

Some common side effects that can happen if you take amitriptyline include:
  • Dry mouth and skin
  • Blurred vision
  • Constipation
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Dizziness when you move from lying down to a sitting position or from sitting to standing
  • Weight gain
  • Sexual difficulties, including impotence and ejaculatory difficulty in men and decreased sexual drive in both men and women
Talk to your doctor if any of these side effects get worse or do not go away while taking amitriptyline.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Amitriptyline is a type of prescription medicine called a tricyclic antidepressant. Amitriptyline is used to treat symptoms of depression. The way amitriptyline works is not yet completely understood. However, it is thought that amitriptyline works by increasing levels of certain chemicals in the brain needed to maintain a balanced mood.

It is not recommended that children younger than age 12 take amitriptyline.

Amitriptyline comes in tablet form. Your doctor will tell you how often you should take amitriptyline. Do not take more or fewer doses of amitriptyline than the doctor prescribes. It is suggested that you take your amitriptyline at around the same time(s) every day.

If you miss a dose of amitriptyline, take it as soon as you can. If it's almost time for your next dose of amitriptyline, skip your missed dose and take your next dose of amitriptyline at the regular time.

Store amitriptyline at room temperature.

It may take a few weeks or longer before you fully feel the benefits of amitriptyline. Your doctor may start you on a low dose of amitriptyline and gradually increase it to find the dose of amitriptyline that works best for you.

It is suggested that you do not suddenly stop taking amitriptyline. This may cause withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, headache, and lack of energy. Your doctor will work with you to gradually decrease your dose of amitriptyline.

It is very important for you to call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms or if they are new, getting worse, or are worrying you:
  • New or worse depression
  • Thoughts about suicide or dying, attempts to commit suicide
  • New or worse anxiety
  • Feeling very agitated or restless
  • Panic attacks
  • Trouble sleeping
  • New or worse irritability
  • Acting aggressive, being angry or violent
  • Acting on dangerous impulses
  • An extreme increase in activity and talking
  • Other unusual changes in behavior or mood
Other medical problems may affect how your doctor will want you to take amitriptyline. Tell your doctor about all of your health problems. It is also important to tell your doctor about any medicines, herbal supplements, or vitamins you are taking before you take amitriptyline. You will want to tell your doctor if you are allergic to any medicines before you take amitriptyline.

Some common side effects that can happen if you take amitriptyline include:
  • Dry mouth and skin
  • Blurred vision
  • Constipation
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Dizziness when you move from lying down to a sitting position or from sitting to standing
  • Weight gain
  • Sexual difficulties, including impotence and ejaculatory difficulty in men and decreased sexual drive in both men and women
Talk to your doctor if any of these side effects get worse or do not go away while taking amitriptyline.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Amitriptyline
Usage by Age
5.14%
under20_base
13.91%
20to40_base
42.7%
40to60_base
38.25%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
73.34%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
26.66%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Amitriptyline
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