Amoxicillin Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Amoxicillin

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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_14505.JPG
Amoxicillin 875mg Tab
Greenstone Ltd
Pill Identification: A  |  6 7
Drug Image file DrugItem_482.JPG
Amoxicillin 250mg Chw Tab
Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc
Pill Identification: 2268  |  9 3
Drug Image file DrugItem_4790.JPG
Amoxicillin 250mg Cap
Sandoz Inc
Pill Identification: AMOX 250 GG 848 
Drug Image file DrugItem_13832.JPG
Amoxicillin 500mg Cap
Greenstone Ltd
Pill Identification: A 45 
Drug Image file DrugItem_13830.JPG
Amoxicillin 250mg Cap
Greenstone Ltd
Pill Identification: A 44 
Overview Information on Amoxicillin
Pharmacist Tip
Liquid amoxicillin is often stored in the refrigerator but may be stored at room temperature. Ask your doctor or pharmacist how to store it. Do not freeze amoxicillin.     
Amoxicillin is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections. Doctors may also use amoxicillin to treat ulcers that are found in the stomach or in some parts of the intestine that are caused by a bacteria called Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori).

Amoxicillin is used to treat infections that may happen in many different parts of your body. Your doctor will decide when treatment with amoxicillin is right for you.

Amoxicillin works by stopping bacteria cells from making the walls that surround them. Without these walls, the bacteria cannot multiply and survive.

Amoxicillin only works to stop bacterial infections. Amoxicillin will not help viral infections, including the common cold and flu.

Infections that doctors may treat with amoxicillin include:
  • Ear, nose, and throat infections
  • Bronchi infections (bronchitis) and lung infections (pneumonia)
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Skin infections
  • Gonorrhea
Continue to take amoxicillin until all the medicine is gone. This is very important even if you feel better or you believe that symptoms have disappeared. If you stop taking amoxicillin sooner than your doctor instructed, the bacteria may continue to grow. This can let the infection return.

Take your amoxicillin exactly the way your doctor tells you to. You may take amoxicillin with or without food. Doctors will decide what the best dosage of amoxicillin is for your medical condition, and how long you should take amoxicillin.

Amoxicillin comes in a capsule, tablet, chewable tablet, suspension, and pediatric drops.

Amoxicillin may be sold under the brand names:
  • Amoxil®
  • Moxatag®
If you miss a dose of amoxicillin, take it as soon as you remember unless it's almost time to take the next dose of amoxicillin.

Tell your doctor if you:
  • Are allergic to amoxicillin, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medicines
  • Are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicines, vitamins, nutritional supplements, or herbal products
  • Have a history of kidney disease
  • Are pregnant, breast-feeding, or plan to be pregnant
If you have a history of allergy, asthma, hay fever, or itching, you may be more likely to have a reaction to amoxicillin. Tell your doctor right away, so they can decide if amoxicillin is the best therapy to treat you.

Severe allergic reactions to amoxicillin may include hives, trouble breathing, and swelling of the face, tongue, lips, or throat. Get emergency attention right away if you have any sign of an allergic reaction.

Common side effects of amoxicillin include:
  • Upset stomach
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Diarrhea
Talk to your doctor if any of these amoxicillin side effects become severe.

More severe side effects to amoxicillin include:
  • Seizures
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • Trouble passing urine or change in amount of urine
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Yellowing of the eyes or skin
  • Excessive tiredness
  • Severe or watery diarrhea
Call your doctor immediately if you have any of these amoxicillin side effects.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Amoxicillin is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections. Doctors may also use amoxicillin to treat ulcers that are found in the stomach or in some parts of the intestine that are caused by a bacteria called Helicobacter pylori (or H. pylori).

Amoxicillin is used to treat infections that may happen in many different parts of your body. Your doctor will decide when treatment with amoxicillin is right for you.

Amoxicillin works by stopping bacteria cells from making the walls that surround them. Without these walls, the bacteria cannot multiply and survive.

Amoxicillin only works to stop bacterial infections. Amoxicillin will not help viral infections, including the common cold and flu.

Infections that doctors may treat with amoxicillin include:
  • Ear, nose, and throat infections
  • Bronchi infections (bronchitis) and lung infections (pneumonia)
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Skin infections
  • Gonorrhea
Continue to take amoxicillin until all the medicine is gone. This is very important even if you feel better or you believe that symptoms have disappeared. If you stop taking amoxicillin sooner than your doctor instructed, the bacteria may continue to grow. This can let the infection return.

Take your amoxicillin exactly the way your doctor tells you to. You may take amoxicillin with or without food. Doctors will decide what the best dosage of amoxicillin is for your medical condition, and how long you should take amoxicillin.

Amoxicillin comes in a capsule, tablet, chewable tablet, suspension, and pediatric drops.

Amoxicillin may be sold under the brand names:
  • Amoxil®
  • Moxatag®
If you miss a dose of amoxicillin, take it as soon as you remember unless it's almost time to take the next dose of amoxicillin.

Tell your doctor if you:
  • Are allergic to amoxicillin, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medicines
  • Are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicines, vitamins, nutritional supplements, or herbal products
  • Have a history of kidney disease
  • Are pregnant, breast-feeding, or plan to be pregnant
If you have a history of allergy, asthma, hay fever, or itching, you may be more likely to have a reaction to amoxicillin. Tell your doctor right away, so they can decide if amoxicillin is the best therapy to treat you.

Severe allergic reactions to amoxicillin may include hives, trouble breathing, and swelling of the face, tongue, lips, or throat. Get emergency attention right away if you have any sign of an allergic reaction.

Common side effects of amoxicillin include:
  • Upset stomach
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Diarrhea
Talk to your doctor if any of these amoxicillin side effects become severe.

More severe side effects to amoxicillin include:
  • Seizures
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • Trouble passing urine or change in amount of urine
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Yellowing of the eyes or skin
  • Excessive tiredness
  • Severe or watery diarrhea
Call your doctor immediately if you have any of these amoxicillin side effects.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Amoxicillin
Usage by Age
56.07%
under20_base
15.4%
20to40_base
15.17%
40to60_base
13.36%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
58.91%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
41.09%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Amoxicillin
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