Atenolol Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Atenolol

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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_9621.JPG
Atenolol 25mg Tab
Zydus Pharmaceuticals (USA) Inc
Pill Identification: Z  |  65
Drug Image file DrugItem_11490.JPG
Atenolol 50mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M  |  231
Drug Image file DrugItem_6112.JPG
Atenolol 100mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M  |  757
Drug Image file DrugItem_13221.JPG
Atenolol 50mg Tab
Ranbaxy Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: RE20 
Drug Image file DrugItem_13221.JPG
Atenolol 50mg Tab
Ranbaxy Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: RE20 
Overview Information on Atenolol
Pharmacist Tip
Check with your doctor before you take medicines for coughs, colds, or pain. Some of these medicines may increase your blood pressure.     
Atenolol is a type of medicine called a beta-blocker, which doctors prescribe along with other kinds of medicine to treat high blood pressure and chest pain. Your doctor may want you to take atenolol to help protect your heart if you have a heart attack and to help prevent you from having another heart attack.

Atenolol helps the heart to beat more regularly. Atenolol relaxes the blood vessels so that blood can flow more easily through your body. While atenolol may improve your high blood pressure and chest pain, it will not cure them.

Atenolol comes as a tablet and is sold under the brand name Tenormin®. Atenolol also comes in a generic form.

Try to take your atenolol around the same time each day. Your doctor will monitor how well atenolol is working and make some dose adjustments so that you get to the best dosage for your condition.

Do not stop taking atenolol without telling your doctor, even if you are not feeling well when taking atenolol. If you suddenly stop taking atenolol, it could put you at risk for serious complications, including a heart attack. If your doctor decides to stop atenolol, he or she will want to wean you off atenolol slowly.

Before you start taking atenolol, tell your doctor if you have any allergies or medical conditions. Also give your doctor a complete list of all the medicines you take, including over-the-counter pills or herbal supplements. It is important to let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Taking atenolol during pregnancy may harm a growing fetus.

Your doctor may want you to make lifestyle changes in addition to taking atenolol for high blood pressure. Be sure to talk to your doctor and then follow his or her instructions carefully.

Other possible side effects of atenolol are:
  • Dizziness, drowsiness, or light-headedness. Do not drive or operate machinery until you know how atenolol affects your alertness.
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Depression
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Change in sex drive or performance
  • Trouble sleeping
Let your doctor know if those side effects last a long time or are severe.

Call your doctor immediately if you have shortness of breath; your hands, legs, feet, or ankles swell; you have unusual weight gain; or you faint while taking atenolol.

Other side effects of atenolol you may have that you should report to your doctor right away include:
  • Chest pain
  • Rapid weight gain
  • Swollen ankles or legs
  • Change in vision
  • Depression


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Atenolol is a type of medicine called a beta-blocker, which doctors prescribe along with other kinds of medicine to treat high blood pressure and chest pain. Your doctor may want you to take atenolol to help protect your heart if you have a heart attack and to help prevent you from having another heart attack.

Atenolol helps the heart to beat more regularly. Atenolol relaxes the blood vessels so that blood can flow more easily through your body. While atenolol may improve your high blood pressure and chest pain, it will not cure them.

Atenolol comes as a tablet and is sold under the brand name Tenormin®. Atenolol also comes in a generic form.

Try to take your atenolol around the same time each day. Your doctor will monitor how well atenolol is working and make some dose adjustments so that you get to the best dosage for your condition.

Do not stop taking atenolol without telling your doctor, even if you are not feeling well when taking atenolol. If you suddenly stop taking atenolol, it could put you at risk for serious complications, including a heart attack. If your doctor decides to stop atenolol, he or she will want to wean you off atenolol slowly.

Before you start taking atenolol, tell your doctor if you have any allergies or medical conditions. Also give your doctor a complete list of all the medicines you take, including over-the-counter pills or herbal supplements. It is important to let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Taking atenolol during pregnancy may harm a growing fetus.

Your doctor may want you to make lifestyle changes in addition to taking atenolol for high blood pressure. Be sure to talk to your doctor and then follow his or her instructions carefully.

Other possible side effects of atenolol are:
  • Dizziness, drowsiness, or light-headedness. Do not drive or operate machinery until you know how atenolol affects your alertness.
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Depression
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Change in sex drive or performance
  • Trouble sleeping
Let your doctor know if those side effects last a long time or are severe.

Call your doctor immediately if you have shortness of breath; your hands, legs, feet, or ankles swell; you have unusual weight gain; or you faint while taking atenolol.

Other side effects of atenolol you may have that you should report to your doctor right away include:
  • Chest pain
  • Rapid weight gain
  • Swollen ankles or legs
  • Change in vision
  • Depression


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Atenolol
Usage by Age
0.93%
under20_base
4.26%
20to40_base
32.15%
40to60_base
62.65%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
61.09%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
38.91%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Atenolol
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