Cipro Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Cipro

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Most Commonly Used
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Cipro 5% Suspension
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Cipro 10% Suspension
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Cipro 10% Suspension
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Cipro 5% Suspension
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Cipro 500mg Tab
Overview Information on Cipro
Pharmacist Tip
If you have diabetes, tell your doctor before taking Cipro. Cipro can lower your blood sugar to a level that may be serious. Your doctor may want to adjust your medicines.     
Cipro® is the brand name of the medicine ciprofloxacin. It is an antibiotic that doctors prescribe to prevent or treat bacterial infections. Like other antibiotics, Cipro only works on illnesses caused by bacteria. Cipro will not work on viral or fungal infections.

Cipro comes as a liquid, tablet, or extended-release tablet. Your doctor will decide on the right dose of Cipro for you. Cipro works best to kill bacteria when you keep a steady amount in your bloodstream during treatment, so take Cipro at the same time each day and do not skip any doses.

Before you start taking Cipro, tell your doctor about any allergies, medical conditions, and medicines you take. Include over-the-counter medicines or herbal supplements, particularly antacids. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, breast-feeding, or planning to become pregnant.

While taking Cipro, use caution when driving or using machinery until you know whether it makes you dizzy, confused, or tired. Also, take care to protect yourself from the sun. Cipro can make your skin more sensitive.

If you start feeling pain, swelling, or stiffness, or have trouble with muscle movement, stop taking Cipro and get emergency help. Tendinitis is a potential risk of taking Cipro. It is caused when tissue that connects bone to muscle in your body swells. In some cases, taking Cipro might cause a tendon to rupture. Tendinitis can happen while you are taking Cipro or months later. While tendonitis can happen to anyone taking Cipro, it most often happens in people over age 60, those taking corticosteroids, or those who have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant.

You may experience side effects while taking Cipro, such as headaches, vaginal itching or discharge, an urgent need to urinate, or gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and heartburn. Call your doctor if these effects are severe or do not go away.

Finish your entire Cipro prescription, unless you experience tendonitis, tendon rupture, or an allergic reaction. If you do not finish treatment, the bacteria may become resistant to Cipro.

Unless the following side effects of Cipro are severe or become bothersome, they don't usually need medical attention:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea or upset stomach
  • White patches or sores in the mouth
Get immediate medical help if you are taking Cipro and have any of the following side effects:
  • Severe diarrhea or stomach cramps, up to two months after you stop taking Cipro
  • Skin problems such as rash, blisters, hives, or itching
  • Swelling of areas on your head, neck, or extremities
  • Hoarseness, wheezing, or difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Changes in heart rate
  • Fainting
  • Fever
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Unusual bruising or bleeding
  • Extreme tiredness, lack of energy, or loss of appetite
  • Pain in the upper right part of the stomach
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • Dark-colored urine
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Seizures, dizziness, confusion, restlessness, or anxiety
  • Sleep problems or nightmares
  • Paranoia, hallucinations, or suicidal thoughts
  • Uncontrollable shaking or pain, burning, tingling, or numbness


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Cipro® is the brand name of the medicine ciprofloxacin. It is an antibiotic that doctors prescribe to prevent or treat bacterial infections. Like other antibiotics, Cipro only works on illnesses caused by bacteria. Cipro will not work on viral or fungal infections.

Cipro comes as a liquid, tablet, or extended-release tablet. Your doctor will decide on the right dose of Cipro for you. Cipro works best to kill bacteria when you keep a steady amount in your bloodstream during treatment, so take Cipro at the same time each day and do not skip any doses.

Before you start taking Cipro, tell your doctor about any allergies, medical conditions, and medicines you take. Include over-the-counter medicines or herbal supplements, particularly antacids. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, breast-feeding, or planning to become pregnant.

While taking Cipro, use caution when driving or using machinery until you know whether it makes you dizzy, confused, or tired. Also, take care to protect yourself from the sun. Cipro can make your skin more sensitive.

If you start feeling pain, swelling, or stiffness, or have trouble with muscle movement, stop taking Cipro and get emergency help. Tendinitis is a potential risk of taking Cipro. It is caused when tissue that connects bone to muscle in your body swells. In some cases, taking Cipro might cause a tendon to rupture. Tendinitis can happen while you are taking Cipro or months later. While tendonitis can happen to anyone taking Cipro, it most often happens in people over age 60, those taking corticosteroids, or those who have had a kidney, heart, or lung transplant.

You may experience side effects while taking Cipro, such as headaches, vaginal itching or discharge, an urgent need to urinate, or gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and heartburn. Call your doctor if these effects are severe or do not go away.

Finish your entire Cipro prescription, unless you experience tendonitis, tendon rupture, or an allergic reaction. If you do not finish treatment, the bacteria may become resistant to Cipro.

Unless the following side effects of Cipro are severe or become bothersome, they don't usually need medical attention:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea or upset stomach
  • White patches or sores in the mouth
Get immediate medical help if you are taking Cipro and have any of the following side effects:
  • Severe diarrhea or stomach cramps, up to two months after you stop taking Cipro
  • Skin problems such as rash, blisters, hives, or itching
  • Swelling of areas on your head, neck, or extremities
  • Hoarseness, wheezing, or difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Changes in heart rate
  • Fainting
  • Fever
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Unusual bruising or bleeding
  • Extreme tiredness, lack of energy, or loss of appetite
  • Pain in the upper right part of the stomach
  • Yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • Dark-colored urine
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Seizures, dizziness, confusion, restlessness, or anxiety
  • Sleep problems or nightmares
  • Paranoia, hallucinations, or suicidal thoughts
  • Uncontrollable shaking or pain, burning, tingling, or numbness


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Cipro
Usage by Age
38.66%
under20_base
12.57%
20to40_base
17.4%
40to60_base
31.37%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
67.56%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
32.44%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Cipro
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