Diclofenac Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
show timeout overlay link

Your Session Is About to Expire

This online session is about to expire due to inactivity. Click Continue to return to page.

Diclofenac

Also see:
  • Get answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Find other class related drugs
  • Find additional patient usage statistics

Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_10085.JPG
Diclofenac Potassium 50mg Tab
Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: M D5 
Drug Image file DrugItem_6459.JPG
Diclofenac Potassium 50mg Tab
Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc
Pill Identification: 93 948 
Drug Image file DrugItem_3771.JPG
Diclofenac Potassium 50mg Tab
Sandoz Inc
Pill Identification: GG 977 
Overview Information on Diclofenac
Pharmacist Tip
If you are having coronary artery bypass graft surgery, you should not take diclofenac before or immediately after your procedure.     
Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, or NSAID. Diclofenac is a medicine doctors prescribe to relieve signs and symptoms of inflammation. When you have inflammation, you can have pain and swelling, feel heat, or see redness to the affected area. Your doctor may have given you diclofenac to treat different types of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (a type of arthritis that affects the spine). The way that diclofenac works is not completely understood, but it is believed that diclofenac blocks a substance in the body that causes pain, fever, and swelling.

In addition to arthritis, doctors may also prescribe diclofenac tablets to treat patients with other types of pain, such as painful menstrual cramps. There is form of diclofenac that comes as eye drops. It is used to treat pain and inflammation after eye surgery.

Diclofenac comes in tablet form as the brand names Cataflam® and Voltaren®. Diclofenac also comes as a liquid-filled capsule by the brand name Zipsor®. Other forms and brand names of diclofenac are a medicated topical patch (Flector®), topical gel (Voltaren® and Solaraze®), and topical solution (Pennsaid®).

Diclofenac comes as both immediate-release tablets and extended-release tablets. Your doctor will tell you how often to take the diclofenac he or she has prescribed to treat your condition.

Before you start taking diclofenac, be sure to tell your doctor if you have any allergies. Also tell your doctor if you are taking any medicines, either prescription or over-the-counter, including supplements and herbal treatments. Some medicines may interact with diclofenac, so make sure to give your doctor a complete list.

Before taking diclofenac, you should also let your doctor know about any medical conditions you have. Also let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding before taking diclofenac.

You may experience some side effects when taking diclofenac. Tell your doctor if any side effects of diclofenac are severe or long-lasting. These side effects of diclofenac may include diarrhea, constipation, heartburn, headaches, and dizziness.

If you are taking diclofenac, you should be aware of some risks associated with NSAIDs, including a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, and gastrointestinal problems such as ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestines.

Get medical help right away if you have any of the following symptoms while taking diclofenac:

  • Unexplained weight gain, loss of appetite, or nausea
  • Vomiting blood
  • Feeling excessively tired or lacking energy
  • Pain in the right upper part of the stomach, yellowing of the skin or eyes, or flulike symptoms
  • Hoarseness or difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Pale skin or a rapid heartbeat
  • Problems urinating; bloody, cloudy, or discolored urine
  • Black or bloody stools
  • Chest pain or trouble breathing
  • Slurred speech or weakness on one side of the body
  • Rash or fever
  • Redness, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, or NSAID. Diclofenac is a medicine doctors prescribe to relieve signs and symptoms of inflammation. When you have inflammation, you can have pain and swelling, feel heat, or see redness to the affected area. Your doctor may have given you diclofenac to treat different types of arthritis, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (a type of arthritis that affects the spine). The way that diclofenac works is not completely understood, but it is believed that diclofenac blocks a substance in the body that causes pain, fever, and swelling.

In addition to arthritis, doctors may also prescribe diclofenac tablets to treat patients with other types of pain, such as painful menstrual cramps. There is form of diclofenac that comes as eye drops. It is used to treat pain and inflammation after eye surgery.

Diclofenac comes in tablet form as the brand names Cataflam® and Voltaren®. Diclofenac also comes as a liquid-filled capsule by the brand name Zipsor®. Other forms and brand names of diclofenac are a medicated topical patch (Flector®), topical gel (Voltaren® and Solaraze®), and topical solution (Pennsaid®).

Diclofenac comes as both immediate-release tablets and extended-release tablets. Your doctor will tell you how often to take the diclofenac he or she has prescribed to treat your condition.

Before you start taking diclofenac, be sure to tell your doctor if you have any allergies. Also tell your doctor if you are taking any medicines, either prescription or over-the-counter, including supplements and herbal treatments. Some medicines may interact with diclofenac, so make sure to give your doctor a complete list.

Before taking diclofenac, you should also let your doctor know about any medical conditions you have. Also let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding before taking diclofenac.

You may experience some side effects when taking diclofenac. Tell your doctor if any side effects of diclofenac are severe or long-lasting. These side effects of diclofenac may include diarrhea, constipation, heartburn, headaches, and dizziness.

If you are taking diclofenac, you should be aware of some risks associated with NSAIDs, including a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, and gastrointestinal problems such as ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestines.

Get medical help right away if you have any of the following symptoms while taking diclofenac:

  • Unexplained weight gain, loss of appetite, or nausea
  • Vomiting blood
  • Feeling excessively tired or lacking energy
  • Pain in the right upper part of the stomach, yellowing of the skin or eyes, or flulike symptoms
  • Hoarseness or difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Pale skin or a rapid heartbeat
  • Problems urinating; bloody, cloudy, or discolored urine
  • Black or bloody stools
  • Chest pain or trouble breathing
  • Slurred speech or weakness on one side of the body
  • Rash or fever
  • Redness, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Diclofenac
Usage by Age
3.39%
under20_base
19.34%
20to40_base
44.33%
40to60_base
32.94%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
64.05%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
35.95%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Diclofenac
Select a specific form of this drug to visit the summary page where you can:
  • Get answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Find other class related drugs
  • Find additional patient usage statistics
Select a Form

Patient Experiences with Diclofenac

Be the first to share your experience!

We want to help our customers stay educated about the medications they are taking. Submit your own observations and experiences to benefit others.

Average Scores
Easy to Take 
0 / 5
0 / 5
Works as Intended 
0 / 5
0 / 5
Tolerable 
0 / 5
0 / 5