Fluconazole Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
show timeout overlay link

Your Session Is About to Expire

This online session is about to expire due to inactivity. Click Continue to return to page.

Fluconazole

Also see:
  • Get answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Find other class related drugs
  • Find additional patient usage statistics

Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_11902.JPG
Fluconazole 200mg Tab
Ivax Pharmaceuticals Inc a Division of Teva USA
Pill Identification: LOGO 200  |  5413
Drug Image file DrugItem_7314.JPG
Fluconazole 150mg Tab
Ivax Pharmaceuticals Inc a Division of Teva USA
Pill Identification: 5412  |  150
Drug Image file DrugItem_8578.JPG
Fluconazole 200mg Tab
Glenmark Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: 200 
Drug Image file DrugItem_8099.JPG
Fluconazole 100mg Tab
Ivax Pharmaceuticals Inc a Division of Teva USA
Pill Identification: LOGO 100  |  5411
Drug Image file default-drug-image.png
Fluconazole 10mg/ml for Susp
Overview Information on Fluconazole
Pharmacist Tip
Keep the mixed oral liquid in the refrigerator or at room temperature and use it within 14 days. Do not freeze.     
Fluconazole is a type of medicine called a triazole, which is an antifungal medicine. Fluconazole is used to treat a fungal infection in your body. Diflucan® is the brand name for fluconazole. It comes as tablets and in liquid forms.

Your doctor might prescribe fluconazole to treat any number of different types of fungal or yeast infections, including those in your mouth, vagina, esophagus, or other areas of the body, such as the urinary tract or in the lining of your abdomen or stomach.

Fluconazole is also used to treat fungal meningitis. It is also used to prevent a certain kind of fungal infection in patients who are going to have a bone marrow transplant. Fluconazole will not work to treat bacterial or viral infections.

Fluconazole will not prevent sexually transmitted diseases or HIV/AIDS.

Before you start taking fluconazole, tell your doctor about any allergies or medical conditions you have. Also tell him or her about any medicines you are taking, because they may interact with fluconazole. Also let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding before taking fluconazole. Your doctor will consider these things when deciding whether fluconazole is the right medicine to treat your condition.

Fluconazole may cause some side effects, including dizziness and seizures, so do not drive until you know how your body reacts to fluconazole.

More common side effects include a change in the way food tastes, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain. Let your doctor know if you have side effects that get worse or won't go away.

Your doctor may want to monitor you or your child closely when taking fluconazole and may use blood tests to look for changes. In some rare cases, fluconazole may harm the liver, so it's important to tell your doctor if you or your child has related symptoms, such as clay-colored stools, dark-colored urine, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, yellow eyes or skin, unusual tiredness or weakness, stomach pain, abdominal tenderness, swelling of the feet or lower legs, skin rash, or itching while taking fluconazole.

Fluconazole may also cause a serious kind of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis or skin problems. Get emergency help if you experience a rash, itching, hives, hoarseness, swelling of a body part, or trouble breathing or swallowing while taking fluconazole.

Tell your doctor immediately, or if an emergency call 911, if you have any of the following side effects while taking fluconazole:

  • Nausea, vomiting, seizures, or flulike symptoms
  • Extreme tiredness, unusual bruising or bleeding, pain in the upper right part of the stomach, or loss of appetite
  • Lack of energy
  • Irregular heartbeat or chest pain
  • Seizures
  • Dark urine, or yellowing of the eyes or skin
  • Redness, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth
Take fluconazole for as long as your doctor told you to, even if you start to feel better. If you stop taking fluconazole too soon, the infection won't go away. Store fluconazole at room temperature, away from water.

If you miss a dose of fluconazole, take it as soon as you remember, unless it's time for your next dose. In that case, skip the missed dose of fluconazole and resume your regular schedule.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Fluconazole is a type of medicine called a triazole, which is an antifungal medicine. Fluconazole is used to treat a fungal infection in your body. Diflucan® is the brand name for fluconazole. It comes as tablets and in liquid forms.

Your doctor might prescribe fluconazole to treat any number of different types of fungal or yeast infections, including those in your mouth, vagina, esophagus, or other areas of the body, such as the urinary tract or in the lining of your abdomen or stomach.

Fluconazole is also used to treat fungal meningitis. It is also used to prevent a certain kind of fungal infection in patients who are going to have a bone marrow transplant. Fluconazole will not work to treat bacterial or viral infections.

Fluconazole will not prevent sexually transmitted diseases or HIV/AIDS.

Before you start taking fluconazole, tell your doctor about any allergies or medical conditions you have. Also tell him or her about any medicines you are taking, because they may interact with fluconazole. Also let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding before taking fluconazole. Your doctor will consider these things when deciding whether fluconazole is the right medicine to treat your condition.

Fluconazole may cause some side effects, including dizziness and seizures, so do not drive until you know how your body reacts to fluconazole.

More common side effects include a change in the way food tastes, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain. Let your doctor know if you have side effects that get worse or won't go away.

Your doctor may want to monitor you or your child closely when taking fluconazole and may use blood tests to look for changes. In some rare cases, fluconazole may harm the liver, so it's important to tell your doctor if you or your child has related symptoms, such as clay-colored stools, dark-colored urine, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, yellow eyes or skin, unusual tiredness or weakness, stomach pain, abdominal tenderness, swelling of the feet or lower legs, skin rash, or itching while taking fluconazole.

Fluconazole may also cause a serious kind of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis or skin problems. Get emergency help if you experience a rash, itching, hives, hoarseness, swelling of a body part, or trouble breathing or swallowing while taking fluconazole.

Tell your doctor immediately, or if an emergency call 911, if you have any of the following side effects while taking fluconazole:

  • Nausea, vomiting, seizures, or flulike symptoms
  • Extreme tiredness, unusual bruising or bleeding, pain in the upper right part of the stomach, or loss of appetite
  • Lack of energy
  • Irregular heartbeat or chest pain
  • Seizures
  • Dark urine, or yellowing of the eyes or skin
  • Redness, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth
Take fluconazole for as long as your doctor told you to, even if you start to feel better. If you stop taking fluconazole too soon, the infection won't go away. Store fluconazole at room temperature, away from water.

If you miss a dose of fluconazole, take it as soon as you remember, unless it's time for your next dose. In that case, skip the missed dose of fluconazole and resume your regular schedule.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Fluconazole
Usage by Age
24.03%
under20_base
19.06%
20to40_base
31.22%
40to60_base
25.69%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
63.2%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
36.8%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Fluconazole
Select a specific form of this drug to visit the summary page where you can:
  • Get answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Find other class related drugs
  • Find additional patient usage statistics
Select a Form

Patient Experiences with Fluconazole

Be the first to share your experience!

We want to help our customers stay educated about the medications they are taking. Submit your own observations and experiences to benefit others.

Average Scores
Easy to Take 
0 / 5
0 / 5
Works as Intended 
0 / 5
0 / 5
Tolerable 
0 / 5
0 / 5