Gabapentin Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Gabapentin

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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_14537.JPG
Gabapentin 400mg Cap
Camber Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: 400 mg IG323 
Drug Image file DrugItem_14536.JPG
Gabapentin 300mg Cap
Camber Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: 300 mg IG322 
Drug Image file DrugItem_14535.JPG
Gabapentin 100mg Cap
Camber Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: 100 mg IG321 
Drug Image file DrugItem_16392.JPG
Gabapentin 600mg Tab
Aurobindo Pharma USA Inc.
Pill Identification: D 24 
Drug Image file DrugItem_14346.JPG
Gabapentin 300mg Cap
Aurobindo Pharma USA Inc.
Pill Identification: D 03 
Overview Information on Gabapentin
Pharmacist Tip
Gabapentin comes in different forms for different purposes. Make sure you check with your doctor to be sure you're not taking more than one gabapentin medicine.     
Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant medicine. Your doctor may have prescribed gabapentin to you to treat a number of conditions, including seizures and restless legs syndrome, or for nerve pain from having the shingles (postherpetic neuralgia).

Restless legs syndrome is a disorder that causes people to feel an urge to move their legs to relieve an uncomfortable feeling that often occurs when they are sitting or at rest. Gabapentin can help ease that discomfort. Gabapentin also reduces pain from postherpetic neuralgia, which is caused by damage to the nerves from the shingles virus.

Gabapentin is available as a capsule, a tablet, an extended-release tablet, or an oral solution. Gabapentin is sold under the brand names Horizant®, Gralise®, and Neurontin®. Dosing instructions and how often you should take gabapentin will depend on the type of gabapentin medicine you are taking. Your doctor will tell you the right way to take gabapentin for your condition. Be sure to follow your doctor's instructions carefully when taking gabapentin.

Before you start taking gabapentin, tell your doctor if you have any allergies or medical conditions. Also tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Give your doctor a complete list of all the medicines you are taking, including over-the-counter medicines or herbal supplements, before starting gabapentin. And let your doctor or dentist know that you are taking gabapentin before you have any type of surgery.

Gabapentin can cause side effects. Let your doctor know if any side effect of gabapentin gets worse, worries you, or does not go away. Some of the more common side effects of gabapentin include:

  • Dizziness
  • Lack of coordination
  • Viral infection
  • Feeling drowsy
  • Feeling tired
  • Fever
  • Jerky movements
  • Difficulty with speaking
  • Temporary loss of memory
  • Tremor
  • Difficulty with coordination
  • Double vision
  • Unusual eye movement
A small number of patients became suicidal when taking gabapentin. Report any changes in mood that include sudden changes in mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings. Tell your doctor right away, or call 911 if an emergency, if you have any of these symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you:

  • Thoughts about suicide or dying
  • Attempts to commit suicide
  • New or worse depression
  • New or worse anxiety
  • Feeling agitated or restless
  • Panic attacks
  • Trouble sleeping (insomnia)
  • New or worse irritability
  • Acting aggressive, being angry, or violent
  • Acting on dangerous impulses
  • Extreme increase in activity and talking (mania)
  • Other unusual changes in behavior or mood
Gabapentin may also cause some other side effects, such as dizziness or drowsiness. Children taking gabapentin may have mood swings and act hostile or hyperactive. They may also become drowsy or clumsy or have trouble staying focused on a task.

Be sure to contact call your doctor right away, or call 911 if an emergency, if you have any of the following symptoms while taking gabapentin:

  • Rash, itching, or swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, or eyes
  • Hoarseness, or trouble swallowing or breathing
  • Seizures
  • Yellowing of your eyes or skin
Do not stop taking gabapentin without telling your doctor first. If you stop taking gabapentin suddenly, you could experience withdrawal symptoms or serious side effects.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant medicine. Your doctor may have prescribed gabapentin to you to treat a number of conditions, including seizures and restless legs syndrome, or for nerve pain from having the shingles (postherpetic neuralgia).

Restless legs syndrome is a disorder that causes people to feel an urge to move their legs to relieve an uncomfortable feeling that often occurs when they are sitting or at rest. Gabapentin can help ease that discomfort. Gabapentin also reduces pain from postherpetic neuralgia, which is caused by damage to the nerves from the shingles virus.

Gabapentin is available as a capsule, a tablet, an extended-release tablet, or an oral solution. Gabapentin is sold under the brand names Horizant®, Gralise®, and Neurontin®. Dosing instructions and how often you should take gabapentin will depend on the type of gabapentin medicine you are taking. Your doctor will tell you the right way to take gabapentin for your condition. Be sure to follow your doctor's instructions carefully when taking gabapentin.

Before you start taking gabapentin, tell your doctor if you have any allergies or medical conditions. Also tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Give your doctor a complete list of all the medicines you are taking, including over-the-counter medicines or herbal supplements, before starting gabapentin. And let your doctor or dentist know that you are taking gabapentin before you have any type of surgery.

Gabapentin can cause side effects. Let your doctor know if any side effect of gabapentin gets worse, worries you, or does not go away. Some of the more common side effects of gabapentin include:

  • Dizziness
  • Lack of coordination
  • Viral infection
  • Feeling drowsy
  • Feeling tired
  • Fever
  • Jerky movements
  • Difficulty with speaking
  • Temporary loss of memory
  • Tremor
  • Difficulty with coordination
  • Double vision
  • Unusual eye movement
A small number of patients became suicidal when taking gabapentin. Report any changes in mood that include sudden changes in mood, behaviors, thoughts, or feelings. Tell your doctor right away, or call 911 if an emergency, if you have any of these symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you:

  • Thoughts about suicide or dying
  • Attempts to commit suicide
  • New or worse depression
  • New or worse anxiety
  • Feeling agitated or restless
  • Panic attacks
  • Trouble sleeping (insomnia)
  • New or worse irritability
  • Acting aggressive, being angry, or violent
  • Acting on dangerous impulses
  • Extreme increase in activity and talking (mania)
  • Other unusual changes in behavior or mood
Gabapentin may also cause some other side effects, such as dizziness or drowsiness. Children taking gabapentin may have mood swings and act hostile or hyperactive. They may also become drowsy or clumsy or have trouble staying focused on a task.

Be sure to contact call your doctor right away, or call 911 if an emergency, if you have any of the following symptoms while taking gabapentin:

  • Rash, itching, or swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, or eyes
  • Hoarseness, or trouble swallowing or breathing
  • Seizures
  • Yellowing of your eyes or skin
Do not stop taking gabapentin without telling your doctor first. If you stop taking gabapentin suddenly, you could experience withdrawal symptoms or serious side effects.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Gabapentin
Usage by Age
3.37%
under20_base
11.78%
20to40_base
41.64%
40to60_base
43.2%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
63.31%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
36.69%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Gabapentin
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