Lisinopril Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Lisinopril

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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_11701.JPG
Lisinopril 2.5mg Tab
Lupin Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: LUPIN  |  2.5
Drug Image file DrugItem_10743.JPG
Lisinopril 10mg Tab
Lupin Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: LUPIN  |  10
Drug Image file DrugItem_10744.JPG
Lisinopril 20mg Tab
Lupin Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: LUPIN  |  20
Drug Image file DrugItem_15201.JPG
Lisinopril 5mg Tab
Lupin Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification:
Drug Image file DrugItem_8595.JPG
Lisinopril 2.5mg Tab
Ivax Pharmaceuticals Inc a Division of Teva USA
Pill Identification: LOGO  |  3757
Overview Information on Lisinopril
Pharmacist Tip
Take lisinopril with a full glass of water. You can take it with or without food.     
Lisinopril is a medicine that belongs to a group of medicines called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Your doctor may be giving you lisinopril to treat high blood pressure. Lisinopril is also given to people to treat heart failure and to lower the chances of dying right after a heart attack. Lisinopril doesn't cure these conditions, but can help improve them.

Lisinopril comes as tablets under the brand names Prinivil® and Zestril®. There may be other brand names for lisinopril. Lisinopril is also available in liquid form.

Lisinopril works by stopping an enzyme that causes your blood vessels to tighten and become narrow. By allowing the blood to flow more easily through your blood vessels, your heart pumps more efficiently. Lowering blood pressure can reduce your risk for having a heart attack or a stroke.

Take lisinopril exactly as your doctor has told you to. He or she may start you on a small dose and adjust it as needed. Take lisinopril around the same time each day. Do not stop taking lisinopril without your doctor's consent.

Lisinopril may cause side effects. Some are more serious than others. Tell your doctor about any side effect that is severe, worries you, or will not go away. Some common side effects of lisinopril may include:
  • Cough
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Stomach upset
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Mild itching or rash
  • Depressed mood
  • Weakness
  • Sneezing or runny nose
  • Change in sexual function or desire
There are some serious side effects that you can have with taking lisinopril. Although these are not as common, it is important to contact your doctor, or 911 in an emergency, if you:
  • Feel light-headed or faint
  • Have swelling or tingling, especially in the mouth or throat
  • Have trouble breathing or swallowing
  • Have chest pain or tightness
  • Develop fever, chills, body aches, or other flulike symptoms
  • Feel confused or weak
  • Pass less urine than usual or not at all
  • Rapidly gain weight
  • Show signs of high potassium: slow heart rate, weak pulse, muscle weakness, or tingly feeling
Before taking lisinopril, your doctor will want to make sure that you can take it safely. Talk with your doctor about any medical condition that you may have. Your doctor may want to know if you have had:
  • Diabetes
  • Kidney or liver disease
  • Heart disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Lupus
  • Scleroderma
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
Also talk about all the medicines you take. Some may react with lisinopril. Give your doctor a complete list, including over-the-counter medicines, herbal remedies, and vitamin supplements. Tell your doctor if you have ever had a bad reaction to any medicine.

Do not take lisinopril if you are pregnant. It can hurt the fetus. If you become pregnant while taking lisinopril, tell your doctor right away. If you are breast-feeding, tell your doctor. Your doctor will want to decide if lisinopril is right for you.

If you need any type of surgery while on lisinopril, tell your doctor that you are taking lisinopril. This includes dental surgery. You may need to stop taking lisinopril for a short time.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Lisinopril is a medicine that belongs to a group of medicines called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Your doctor may be giving you lisinopril to treat high blood pressure. Lisinopril is also given to people to treat heart failure and to lower the chances of dying right after a heart attack. Lisinopril doesn't cure these conditions, but can help improve them.

Lisinopril comes as tablets under the brand names Prinivil® and Zestril®. There may be other brand names for lisinopril. Lisinopril is also available in liquid form.

Lisinopril works by stopping an enzyme that causes your blood vessels to tighten and become narrow. By allowing the blood to flow more easily through your blood vessels, your heart pumps more efficiently. Lowering blood pressure can reduce your risk for having a heart attack or a stroke.

Take lisinopril exactly as your doctor has told you to. He or she may start you on a small dose and adjust it as needed. Take lisinopril around the same time each day. Do not stop taking lisinopril without your doctor's consent.

Lisinopril may cause side effects. Some are more serious than others. Tell your doctor about any side effect that is severe, worries you, or will not go away. Some common side effects of lisinopril may include:
  • Cough
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Stomach upset
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Mild itching or rash
  • Depressed mood
  • Weakness
  • Sneezing or runny nose
  • Change in sexual function or desire
There are some serious side effects that you can have with taking lisinopril. Although these are not as common, it is important to contact your doctor, or 911 in an emergency, if you:
  • Feel light-headed or faint
  • Have swelling or tingling, especially in the mouth or throat
  • Have trouble breathing or swallowing
  • Have chest pain or tightness
  • Develop fever, chills, body aches, or other flulike symptoms
  • Feel confused or weak
  • Pass less urine than usual or not at all
  • Rapidly gain weight
  • Show signs of high potassium: slow heart rate, weak pulse, muscle weakness, or tingly feeling
Before taking lisinopril, your doctor will want to make sure that you can take it safely. Talk with your doctor about any medical condition that you may have. Your doctor may want to know if you have had:
  • Diabetes
  • Kidney or liver disease
  • Heart disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Lupus
  • Scleroderma
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
Also talk about all the medicines you take. Some may react with lisinopril. Give your doctor a complete list, including over-the-counter medicines, herbal remedies, and vitamin supplements. Tell your doctor if you have ever had a bad reaction to any medicine.

Do not take lisinopril if you are pregnant. It can hurt the fetus. If you become pregnant while taking lisinopril, tell your doctor right away. If you are breast-feeding, tell your doctor. Your doctor will want to decide if lisinopril is right for you.

If you need any type of surgery while on lisinopril, tell your doctor that you are taking lisinopril. This includes dental surgery. You may need to stop taking lisinopril for a short time.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Lisinopril
Usage by Age
0.51%
under20_base
5.51%
20to40_base
37.12%
40to60_base
56.86%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
46.55%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
53.45%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Lisinopril
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