Metoprolol Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Metoprolol

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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_11249.JPG
Metoprolol Succ 100mg ER Tab
Par Pharmaceutical Inc
Pill Identification: m 100 
Drug Image file DrugItem_9909.JPG
Metoprolol Succ 25mg ER Tab
Par Pharmaceutical Inc
Pill Identification: m B 
Drug Image file DrugItem_9861.JPG
Metoprolol Succ 200mg ER Tab
Par Pharmaceutical Inc
Pill Identification: m 200 
Drug Image file DrugItem_11191.JPG
Metoprolol Succ 50mg ER Tab
Par Pharmaceutical Inc
Pill Identification: m 50 
Drug Image file DrugItem_13633.JPG
Metoprolol Succ 100mg ER Tab
Watson Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: LOGO 832 
Overview Information on Metoprolol
Pharmacist Tip
If you forget to take your medicine, take it as soon as you remember, unless it's close to the time you take your next dose. In that case, skip the missed dose and resume your regular schedule.     
Metoprolol is a kind of medicine called a beta-blocker. Your doctor might prescribe metoprolol along with other medicines to treat hypertension, which is also called high blood pressure. Your doctor may have given you metoprolol to treat chest pain (angina), to reduce the number of chest pain attacks, and to help you be able to tolerate exercise without angina. Metoprolol is also given to patients to treat heart failure.

The exact way in which medicines such as metoprolol work to lower blood pressure and to help to improve heart failure is not completely understood. However, it is known that metoprolol reduces the workload on your heart and helps it to beat more regularly. Metoprolol can improve your condition, but it will not cure the underlying disease.

Your doctor will want to monitor your condition after your start taking metoprolol to see if you will need a change in your dosage. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose of metoprolol and then increase your metoprolol slowly. Your doctor will probably tell you to take metoprolol right after a meal. Swallow metoprolol whole. Do not crush or chew the tablets. Metoprolol comes as the brand names Lopressor® and Toprol-XL®.

Keep in mind that it may take a few weeks before metoprolol begins to fully take effect. Don't stop taking metoprolol without telling your doctor. If your doctor decides to have you stop taking metoprolol, your doctor will want to take you off slowly. Stopping metoprolol abruptly may cause you to have a heart attack or experience chest pain.

Before you start taking metoprolol, tell your doctor if you have any allergies or medical conditions. Also give your doctor a complete list of all the medicines you take, including over-the-counter medicines, or herbal supplements, because they may interact with metoprolol. Tell your dentist that you are taking metoprolol if you are having a dental procedure. And let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding before starting metoprolol. Your doctor will want to decide if metoprolol is the right medicine for you during these conditions.

There is a chance that metoprolol may make you feel drowsy. Alcohol may add to that effect.

If you have had a severe allergic reaction in the past that required epinephrine, tell your doctor. Metoprolol can change the way your body responds to traditional doses of epinephrine.

In addition, metoprolol may also produce other side effects. Tell your doctor if they are severe or last a long time. When taking metoprolol, you may feel dizzy, tired, depressed, or nauseous. Some patients experience dry mouth, stomach pain, vomiting, bloating, heartburn, constipation, rash, itching, cold hands and feet, or a runny nose. These are not all the side effects that can happen when you take metoprolol. Let your doctor know if you have any side effect that worries you or will not go away.

Call your doctor right away if you start to feel short of breath or are wheezing; have swelling in your hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; have unusual weight gain; faint; or have changes in your heart rate when taking metoprolol.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Metoprolol is a kind of medicine called a beta-blocker. Your doctor might prescribe metoprolol along with other medicines to treat hypertension, which is also called high blood pressure. Your doctor may have given you metoprolol to treat chest pain (angina), to reduce the number of chest pain attacks, and to help you be able to tolerate exercise without angina. Metoprolol is also given to patients to treat heart failure.

The exact way in which medicines such as metoprolol work to lower blood pressure and to help to improve heart failure is not completely understood. However, it is known that metoprolol reduces the workload on your heart and helps it to beat more regularly. Metoprolol can improve your condition, but it will not cure the underlying disease.

Your doctor will want to monitor your condition after your start taking metoprolol to see if you will need a change in your dosage. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose of metoprolol and then increase your metoprolol slowly. Your doctor will probably tell you to take metoprolol right after a meal. Swallow metoprolol whole. Do not crush or chew the tablets. Metoprolol comes as the brand names Lopressor® and Toprol-XL®.

Keep in mind that it may take a few weeks before metoprolol begins to fully take effect. Don't stop taking metoprolol without telling your doctor. If your doctor decides to have you stop taking metoprolol, your doctor will want to take you off slowly. Stopping metoprolol abruptly may cause you to have a heart attack or experience chest pain.

Before you start taking metoprolol, tell your doctor if you have any allergies or medical conditions. Also give your doctor a complete list of all the medicines you take, including over-the-counter medicines, or herbal supplements, because they may interact with metoprolol. Tell your dentist that you are taking metoprolol if you are having a dental procedure. And let your doctor know if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding before starting metoprolol. Your doctor will want to decide if metoprolol is the right medicine for you during these conditions.

There is a chance that metoprolol may make you feel drowsy. Alcohol may add to that effect.

If you have had a severe allergic reaction in the past that required epinephrine, tell your doctor. Metoprolol can change the way your body responds to traditional doses of epinephrine.

In addition, metoprolol may also produce other side effects. Tell your doctor if they are severe or last a long time. When taking metoprolol, you may feel dizzy, tired, depressed, or nauseous. Some patients experience dry mouth, stomach pain, vomiting, bloating, heartburn, constipation, rash, itching, cold hands and feet, or a runny nose. These are not all the side effects that can happen when you take metoprolol. Let your doctor know if you have any side effect that worries you or will not go away.

Call your doctor right away if you start to feel short of breath or are wheezing; have swelling in your hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; have unusual weight gain; faint; or have changes in your heart rate when taking metoprolol.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Metoprolol
Usage by Age
0.09%
under20_base
4.01%
20to40_base
34.21%
40to60_base
61.69%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
52.32%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
47.68%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Metoprolol
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