Sertraline Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Sertraline

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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_11396.JPG
Sertraline 25mg Tab
Camber Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: I G  |  212
Drug Image file DrugItem_10898.JPG
Sertraline 25mg Tab
Lupin Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: L U  |  D01
Drug Image file default-drug-image.png
Sertraline 20mg/ml Conc Soln
Drug Image file DrugItem_11399.JPG
Sertraline 100mg Tab
Camber Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: I G  |  214
Drug Image file DrugItem_11397.JPG
Sertraline 50mg Tab
Camber Pharmaceuticals Inc
Pill Identification: I G  |  213
Overview Information on Sertraline
Pharmacist Tip
If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you realize it, unless it is close to the time for your next dose. Do not double a dose to make up for the missed dose.     
Sertraline is a medicine that belongs to a group of medicines called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Doctors prescribe sertraline to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Zoloft® is the brand-name product for sertraline. Sertraline comes as either tablets or a liquid form. Your doctor will tell you how to take sertraline to treat your condition. Your doctor may adjust your dose of sertraline over time to best treat your condition. It is important to take sertraline at the same time every day. Never suddenly stop taking sertraline unless your doctor tells you to. If you suddenly stop taking sertraline, you could have side effects such as mood changes, irritability, agitation, dizziness, feeling sensations like electric shocks, confusion, and others. Some of these side effects could become serious. Talk with your doctor first if you are thinking about stopping sertraline.

The liquid form of sertraline is a concentrate. Follow your doctor's instruction as to how to take liquid sertraline.

It is thought that sertraline works by increasing the amount of a chemical called serotonin in your brain. This chemical affects mental stability.

Some people may experience side effects from sertraline such as:
  • Nausea, vomiting, or indigestion
  • Diarrhea
  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Nervousness
  • Shakiness
  • Sore throat
  • Changes in libido or sexual function
  • Increased sweating
Sertraline can cause drowsiness, dizziness, and feeling very tired. Avoid driving or operating heavy machinery until you know how sertraline affects you. Avoid drinking alcohol, because it may increase these symptoms and interfere with the way that sertraline works in your body.

Seek help right away, or call 911 if an emergency, if you experience more serious side effects, such as:
  • Seizures or convulsions
  • Feelings of extreme energy, severe trouble sleeping, racing thoughts, reckless behavior, unusually grand ideas, excessive happiness or irritability, or talking more or faster than usual
  • Fever, sweating, confusion, irregular heartbeat, and muscle stiffness
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Hallucinations, agitation, or changes in mental status
  • Coordination problems, muscle twitching, or muscle rigidity
  • Racing heartbeat
  • High or low blood pressure
A small number of people have become suicidal after taking sertraline. This is more common in people younger than age 25. It is important for you to be aware of this risk while taking sertraline. Report any suicidal impulses, thoughts, or actions, or call 911 if an emergency, if you have suicidal thoughts or actions, or extreme changes in your mood.

Sertraline is not for everyone. Before taking sertraline, talk with your doctor about any health conditions you have had in the past, including:
  • Seizure disorders
  • Heart, liver, or kidney disease
  • Bleeding or blood-clotting disorders
  • Bipolar or manic disorders
  • Suicidal thoughts
Women who are pregnant, breast-feeding, or planning to become pregnant should talk with their doctors about taking sertraline. Discuss with your doctor the benefits as well as the risks of treating your condition during pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking sertraline, notify your doctor.

Sertraline can cause dangerous interactions with some medicines, including other prescription medicines, over-the-counter medicines, and dietary and herbal supplements. Give your doctor an up-to-date list of all medicines you take. Your doctor will want to make sure all your medicines are safe to take with sertraline.

Also, tell your doctor about any allergies that you have. The dropper used to measure the liquid form of sertraline contains a derivative of latex, which some people may be sensitive to.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Sertraline is a medicine that belongs to a group of medicines called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Doctors prescribe sertraline to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Zoloft® is the brand-name product for sertraline. Sertraline comes as either tablets or a liquid form. Your doctor will tell you how to take sertraline to treat your condition. Your doctor may adjust your dose of sertraline over time to best treat your condition. It is important to take sertraline at the same time every day. Never suddenly stop taking sertraline unless your doctor tells you to. If you suddenly stop taking sertraline, you could have side effects such as mood changes, irritability, agitation, dizziness, feeling sensations like electric shocks, confusion, and others. Some of these side effects could become serious. Talk with your doctor first if you are thinking about stopping sertraline.

The liquid form of sertraline is a concentrate. Follow your doctor's instruction as to how to take liquid sertraline.

It is thought that sertraline works by increasing the amount of a chemical called serotonin in your brain. This chemical affects mental stability.

Some people may experience side effects from sertraline such as:
  • Nausea, vomiting, or indigestion
  • Diarrhea
  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Nervousness
  • Shakiness
  • Sore throat
  • Changes in libido or sexual function
  • Increased sweating
Sertraline can cause drowsiness, dizziness, and feeling very tired. Avoid driving or operating heavy machinery until you know how sertraline affects you. Avoid drinking alcohol, because it may increase these symptoms and interfere with the way that sertraline works in your body.

Seek help right away, or call 911 if an emergency, if you experience more serious side effects, such as:
  • Seizures or convulsions
  • Feelings of extreme energy, severe trouble sleeping, racing thoughts, reckless behavior, unusually grand ideas, excessive happiness or irritability, or talking more or faster than usual
  • Fever, sweating, confusion, irregular heartbeat, and muscle stiffness
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Hallucinations, agitation, or changes in mental status
  • Coordination problems, muscle twitching, or muscle rigidity
  • Racing heartbeat
  • High or low blood pressure
A small number of people have become suicidal after taking sertraline. This is more common in people younger than age 25. It is important for you to be aware of this risk while taking sertraline. Report any suicidal impulses, thoughts, or actions, or call 911 if an emergency, if you have suicidal thoughts or actions, or extreme changes in your mood.

Sertraline is not for everyone. Before taking sertraline, talk with your doctor about any health conditions you have had in the past, including:
  • Seizure disorders
  • Heart, liver, or kidney disease
  • Bleeding or blood-clotting disorders
  • Bipolar or manic disorders
  • Suicidal thoughts
Women who are pregnant, breast-feeding, or planning to become pregnant should talk with their doctors about taking sertraline. Discuss with your doctor the benefits as well as the risks of treating your condition during pregnancy. If you become pregnant while taking sertraline, notify your doctor.

Sertraline can cause dangerous interactions with some medicines, including other prescription medicines, over-the-counter medicines, and dietary and herbal supplements. Give your doctor an up-to-date list of all medicines you take. Your doctor will want to make sure all your medicines are safe to take with sertraline.

Also, tell your doctor about any allergies that you have. The dropper used to measure the liquid form of sertraline contains a derivative of latex, which some people may be sensitive to.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Sertraline
Usage by Age
21.12%
under20_base
21.65%
20to40_base
30.42%
40to60_base
26.81%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
66.33%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
33.67%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Sertraline
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