show timeout overlay link

Your Session Is About to Expire

This online session is about to expire due to inactivity. Click Continue to return to page.

Suboxone

Most Commonly Used
Suboxone 8mg-2mg SL Film
Drug Image file default-drug-image.png
Suboxone 2mg-0.5mg SL Film
Drug Image file default-drug-image.png
Suboxone 8mg-2mg SL Film
Drug Image file default-drug-image.png
Suboxone 2mg-0.5mg SL Film
Drug Image file default-drug-image.png
Also See:
  • Answers to Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Other Class Related Drugs
  • Additional Patient Usage Statistics


Overview Information on Suboxone
Pharmacist Tip
Drink a glass of water to moisten your mouth before taking Suboxone. This will help the medicine dissolve more easily.     
Suboxone® is a medicine that is given to people to treat opioid dependence or addiction. Suboxone has two active medicines: buprenorphine (an opioid) and naloxone (a drug that reverses the effects of other narcotic medicines). Do not take Suboxone if you have ever had an allergic reaction to either ingredient.

You take Suboxone by mouth, as a dissolving film. Suboxone film is designed to dissolve when placed under the tongue. Your doctor will tell you how much Suboxone to take and when. You should not chew or break the Suboxone film. And don't swallow them whole--your body may not absorb enough medicine if they don't fully dissolve in your mouth.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Suboxone® is a medicine that is given to people to treat opioid dependence or addiction. Suboxone has two active medicines: buprenorphine (an opioid) and naloxone (a drug that reverses the effects of other narcotic medicines). Do not take Suboxone if you have ever had an allergic reaction to either ingredient.

You take Suboxone by mouth, as a dissolving film. Suboxone film is designed to dissolve when placed under the tongue. Your doctor will tell you how much Suboxone to take and when. You should not chew or break the Suboxone film. And don't swallow them whole--your body may not absorb enough medicine if they don't fully dissolve in your mouth.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013