Xanax Information - Side Effects, Drug Interactions, Conditions
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Xanax

Overview Information
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Most Commonly Used
Drug Image file DrugItem_87.JPG
Xanax 0.5mg Tab
Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: XANAX 0.5 
Drug Image file DrugItem_88.JPG
Xanax 1mg Tab
Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: XANAX 1.0 
Drug Image file DrugItem_85.JPG
Xanax 0.25mg Tab
Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: XANAX 0.25 
Drug Image file DrugItem_7240.JPG
Xanax 2mg Tab
Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals
Pill Identification: XANAX  |  2
Overview Information on Xanax
Pharmacist Tip
Ask your doctor if you can drink grapefruit juice when you are taking Xanax.     
Xanax® is a kind of medicine called a benzodiazepine. Xanax is taken to treat anxiety and panic disorders, because it is thought to slow down activity in the nervous system, producing a calming effect on the brain.

Xanax is the brand name for a generic medicine called alprazolam. Your doctor will determine the right dose of Xanax based on your condition and how you respond to the medicine. The doctor may start you on a low dose of Xanax and gradually increase your dose over time.

Make sure you take Xanax for only as long as your doctor tells you to. If you take Xanax for a long time, you may become dependent on it. It is important to tell your doctor before you stop taking Xanax, because if you stop taking it abruptly, you may experience withdrawal symptoms.

Xanax is a medicine that has the potential for drug abuse. Keep your medicines in a secure place where they are protected from theft. Never give Xanax to anyone, even if they tell you they have the same condition as you. It is dangerous and illegal to do so.

Xanax may cause some side effects. You should let your doctor know if they are severe or don't go away. They may include but aren't limited to:
  • Drowsiness, light-headedness, dizziness, irritability, or fatigue
  • Headaches or difficulty concentrating
  • Talkativeness
  • Dry mouth or increased saliva production
  • Changes in sex drive
  • Constipation
  • Nausea or weight changes
  • Difficulty in urination
  • Joint pain
Let your doctor know immediately if you feel short of breath, have seizures, are hallucinating, or get a severe skin rash when taking Xanax. The same is true if you have yellowing of your skin or eyes, feel depressed, have memory problems, are confused, have trouble speaking, feel suicidal or have other changes in mood, or have problems with coordination or balance.

If you forget a dose of Xanax, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is time for your next dose of Xanax. In that case, skip the missed dose of Xanax and return to your regular schedule. Store Xanax at room temperature, away from excess heat, light, or moisture.

Your doctor may decide to give you a lower dose of Xanax if you are older than age 65. Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicines or supplements, especially St. John's wort, because they may interact with Xanax. Your doctor may choose a different medicine than Xanax if you have glaucoma. Be sure to tell your doctor if you are pregnant or become pregnant while taking Xanax.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Xanax® is a kind of medicine called a benzodiazepine. Xanax is taken to treat anxiety and panic disorders, because it is thought to slow down activity in the nervous system, producing a calming effect on the brain.

Xanax is the brand name for a generic medicine called alprazolam. Your doctor will determine the right dose of Xanax based on your condition and how you respond to the medicine. The doctor may start you on a low dose of Xanax and gradually increase your dose over time.

Make sure you take Xanax for only as long as your doctor tells you to. If you take Xanax for a long time, you may become dependent on it. It is important to tell your doctor before you stop taking Xanax, because if you stop taking it abruptly, you may experience withdrawal symptoms.

Xanax is a medicine that has the potential for drug abuse. Keep your medicines in a secure place where they are protected from theft. Never give Xanax to anyone, even if they tell you they have the same condition as you. It is dangerous and illegal to do so.

Xanax may cause some side effects. You should let your doctor know if they are severe or don't go away. They may include but aren't limited to:
  • Drowsiness, light-headedness, dizziness, irritability, or fatigue
  • Headaches or difficulty concentrating
  • Talkativeness
  • Dry mouth or increased saliva production
  • Changes in sex drive
  • Constipation
  • Nausea or weight changes
  • Difficulty in urination
  • Joint pain
Let your doctor know immediately if you feel short of breath, have seizures, are hallucinating, or get a severe skin rash when taking Xanax. The same is true if you have yellowing of your skin or eyes, feel depressed, have memory problems, are confused, have trouble speaking, feel suicidal or have other changes in mood, or have problems with coordination or balance.

If you forget a dose of Xanax, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is time for your next dose of Xanax. In that case, skip the missed dose of Xanax and return to your regular schedule. Store Xanax at room temperature, away from excess heat, light, or moisture.

Your doctor may decide to give you a lower dose of Xanax if you are older than age 65. Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicines or supplements, especially St. John's wort, because they may interact with Xanax. Your doctor may choose a different medicine than Xanax if you have glaucoma. Be sure to tell your doctor if you are pregnant or become pregnant while taking Xanax.


Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013

CVS Patient Statistics for Xanax
Usage by Age
0.45%
under20_base
10.22%
20to40_base
45.89%
40to60_base
43.44%
over60_base
Most Commonly Used By CVS Patients
Usage by Gender
female_fill_graph
71.68%
female_fill_graph
male_fill_graph
28.32%
male_fill_graph
Learn More About Xanax
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