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OxyContin

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Most Commonly Used

OxyContin 20mg ER Tab
Purdue Pharma LP
Pill Identification: OP  |  20
Drug Image
OxyContin 10mg ER Tab
Purdue Pharma LP
Pill Identification: OP  |  10
Drug Image
OxyContin 40mg ER Tab
Purdue Pharma LP
Pill Identification: OP  |  40
Drug Image
OxyContin 30mg ER Tab
Purdue Pharma LP
Pill Identification: OP  |  30
Drug Image
OxyContin 15mg ER Tab
Purdue Pharma LP
Pill Identification: OP  |  15
Drug Image

Also See:

  • Answers to Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Other Class Related Drugs
  • Additional Patient Usage Statistics


Overview Information on OxyContin

Pharmacist Tip
Eat a diet rich in fiber and drink plenty of water to prevent constipation while taking OxyContin.     
OxyContin®, the brand name for oxycodone, is an opiate (or narcotic pain reliever) used to treat moderate to severe pain. Doctors use it to treat ongoing pain, not to treat pain on an "as-needed" basis.

OxyContin binds to the opioid receptors in the brain and central nervous system, increasing the body's tolerance to pain and decreasing its perception of and reaction to pain.

Doctors typically prescribe OxyContin to treat pain expected to last for an extended period of time, such as pain that cancer patients may feel.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
OxyContin®, the brand name for oxycodone, is an opiate (or narcotic pain reliever) used to treat moderate to severe pain. Doctors use it to treat ongoing pain, not to treat pain on an "as-needed" basis.

OxyContin binds to the opioid receptors in the brain and central nervous system, increasing the body's tolerance to pain and decreasing its perception of and reaction to pain.

Doctors typically prescribe OxyContin to treat pain expected to last for an extended period of time, such as pain that cancer patients may feel.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013