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Paroxetine

Most Commonly Used
Paroxetine 40mg Tab
Aurobindo Pharma USA Inc.
Pill Identification: A59 
Drug Image file DrugItem_14124.JPG
Paroxetine 10mg Tab
Aurolife Pharma, LLC an Aurobindo Company
Pill Identification: C55 
Drug Image file DrugItem_14477.JPG
Paroxetine 20mg Tab
Aurolife Pharma, LLC an Aurobindo Company
Pill Identification: C  |  56
Drug Image file DrugItem_12571.JPG
Paroxetine 30mg Tab
Aurolife Pharma, LLC an Aurobindo Company
Pill Identification: F  |  12
Drug Image file DrugItem_14483.JPG
Paroxetine 20mg Tab
Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc
Pill Identification: 9 3  |  7115
Drug Image file DrugItem_9071.JPG
Also See:
  • Answers to Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Other Class Related Drugs
  • Additional Patient Usage Statistics


Overview Information on Paroxetine
Pharmacist Tip
It may take many weeks for you to feel the full effect of paroxetine. Follow your doctor's instructions.     
Paroxetine is a prescription medicine used as an antidepressant.

Paroxetine is sold under the brand names Paxil®, Paxil CR®, and Pexeva®.

Paroxetine increases the activity of serotonin, a chemical in your brain associated with appetite, learning, and memory. The chemical also affects mood.

Your doctor may give you paroxetine to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Paroxetine is a prescription medicine used as an antidepressant.

Paroxetine is sold under the brand names Paxil®, Paxil CR®, and Pexeva®.

Paroxetine increases the activity of serotonin, a chemical in your brain associated with appetite, learning, and memory. The chemical also affects mood.

Your doctor may give you paroxetine to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013