show timeout overlay link

Your Session Is About to Expire

This online session is about to expire due to inactivity. Click Continue to return to page.

  • Weekly Ad

Singulair

Previous Next

Most Commonly Used

Singulair 10mg Tab
Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a Subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc.
Pill Identification: MSD 117  |  SINGULAIR
Drug Image
Singulair 5mg Chw Tab
Drug Image
Singulair 4mg Chw Tab
Drug Image
Singulair 4mg Granules
Drug Image
Singulair 5mg Chw Tab
Drug Image

Also See:

  • Answers to Frequently-Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Other Class Related Drugs
  • Additional Patient Usage Statistics


Overview Information on Singulair

Pharmacist Tip
Tablets should be swallowed whole with a full glass of water.     
Singulair® is the brand name for a medicine called montelukast. Your doctor may have given you Singulair to manage your asthma and to prevent further attacks. Singulair is also given to prevent tightening of your airways during exercise, which is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), and to treat seasonal allergies.

Singulair works by blocking the release of certain chemicals in the body called leukotrienes. These chemicals cause swelling, tightening, and inflammation in the lungs and airways, which are found in people with asthma, EIB, and allergies.

To get the most benefit from taking Singulair, take it exactly as your doctor tells you to. Singulair is not meant to treat asthma attacks once they have already begun. Your doctor may want you to keep an asthma rescue inhaler on hand in case an asthma attack does happen. Take Singulair every day, even if you have no asthma symptoms. Let your doctor know if asthma attacks happen frequently. Your doctor will want to know so that he or she can adjust your Singulair prescription.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013
Singulair® is the brand name for a medicine called montelukast. Your doctor may have given you Singulair to manage your asthma and to prevent further attacks. Singulair is also given to prevent tightening of your airways during exercise, which is called exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), and to treat seasonal allergies.

Singulair works by blocking the release of certain chemicals in the body called leukotrienes. These chemicals cause swelling, tightening, and inflammation in the lungs and airways, which are found in people with asthma, EIB, and allergies.

To get the most benefit from taking Singulair, take it exactly as your doctor tells you to. Singulair is not meant to treat asthma attacks once they have already begun. Your doctor may want you to keep an asthma rescue inhaler on hand in case an asthma attack does happen. Take Singulair every day, even if you have no asthma symptoms. Let your doctor know if asthma attacks happen frequently. Your doctor will want to know so that he or she can adjust your Singulair prescription.



Clinical Review by Jodi Grimm, RPh and Ann Ciemnoczolowski, MS, ELS on May 15, 2013