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Diet & Nutrition

Stay on track with one of our protein bundles.


Smoothie bundles

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Tastier (and healthier) smoothies start here

Simple mocha shake ingredients


Simple mocha shake recipe

Love having your morning smoothie alongside a cup of coffee? Why not combine the two for the perfect pick-me-up. This Mocha Shake uses all of your kitchen essentials, making it easy to whip up on the run.

Prep Time
5 minutes

Servings
1

Ingredients

  • 1 serving Chocolate Vega® Essentials

  • 1 frozen banana

  • 3/4 cup cold coffee

  • 1/2 cup vanilla almond milk

  • 1 tsp almond butter

  • 1/2 cup ice

Directions

  • Combine all ingredients in blender and blend.

Tastier (and healthier) smoothies start here

Chocolate banana smoothie ingredients


Chocolate banana smoothie

This simple combination is a fan favorite. Use frozen bananas if you have them on-hand, as they make this smoothie extra rich and creamy. Enjoy!

Prep Time
5 minutes

Servings
1

Ingredients

  • 1 banana, fresh or frozen

  • 1 cup unsweetened milk alternative

  • 1 serving Chocolate Vega One™ Nutritional Shake

Preparation

  • Blend and enjoy!

Tastier (and healthier) smoothies start here

Oatmeal cookie protein smoothie ingredients


Oatmeal cookie protein smoothie

This simple combination is a fan favorite. Use frozen bananas if you have them on-hand, as they make this smoothie extra rich and creamy. Enjoy!

Prep Time
5 minutes

Servings
1

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Silk® Unsweetened Original Almondmilk

  • 1 serving Vanilla Vega® Protein & Greens

  • ⅓ cup rolled oats

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 1 tsp maple syrup

  • A pinch of sea salt

  • ½ cup of ice

Preparation

  • Place all ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.

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French vanilla chia pudding with pears ingredients


French vanilla chia pudding with pears

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup chia seeds

  • 1 - 1 1/2 cups milk alternative (coconut or almond)

  • 1 serving of French Vanilla Vega One™ Nutritional Shake

  • 2 pears, sliced

  • A pinch of cinnamon

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line baking sheet with foil.

  • Toss sliced pears and cinnamon together. Line baking sheet with pears. Bake 10-20 minutes or until roasted and slightly browned.

  • Combine chia, milk alternative, and French vanilla vega. Stir. Let sit in fridge until thickened. 30 minutes -1 hour.

  • Mix roasted pears and pudding together.

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Hit the gym


Protein FAQs


Protein 411: The basics

Provided by

  • Protein is one of three macronutrients – including carbs and fat - and is made up of amino acids, which are the building blocks needed to build tissues in your body.

  • Proteins make up many of your body’s structures, including muscle tissue, bone, skin and hair.

  • Proteins play a major role in the creation of enzymes, hormones, vitamins and neurotransmitters.

See more at myvega.com.

How much protein do I need?

Provided by

The Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for adults is based upon the protein and amino acids needed to maintain body tissues and replace losses.

For most of us, we can easily calculate our minimum daily protein needs:

  • Start with your weight in pounds

  • Multiply your weight by 0.36 grams

  • For example: A 150lb woman would need a minimum of 54 grams of protein per day.
    • (150lb x .36 grams of protein = 54 grams of protein per day)

See more at myvega.com.

Can protein help with weight management?

Provided by

As part of a healthy diet, eating protein may help you maintain a healthy weight. In higher amounts it may help you feel full.

See more at myvega.com.

Categories of dietary protein: Complete vs. incomplete

Provided by

There are two categories of dietary protein: complete and incomplete. Animal - and soy-based proteins tend to be complete, meaning they contain all of the nine essential amino acids in adequate amounts that your body needs to build proteins. Most plant-foods, are lower in one or two of the essential amino acids, and are referred to as incomplete proteins.

See more at myvega.com.

What are the versatile sources of plant-based protein?

Provided by

  • Quinoa

  • Lentils

  • Chickpeas

  • Tempeh

  • Black beans

  • Organic tofu

See more at myvega.com.

Should I be on a low-carb, high-protein diet?

Provided by

While protein is a super-important macronutrient in our diet, it shouldn’t be the only one. Don’t leave out those quality carbohydrates, like fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and good fats like avocado and walnuts.

See more at myvega.com.


Featured content


How to pick your protein supplement

By Suzanne Dixon, MPH, MS, RD

If you take your workouts seriously, nutrition should be top of mind too. Protein is a great place to start, and focusing on getting the right types of protein, in the right amounts, and at the right times is key. Our protein supplement guide will help you meet your wellness goals, potentially improving your performance on the court, in the gym, or on the road. What type?

Whey

Whey protein is quick to digest and provides all of the protein building blocks—the amino acids. Our bodies cannot make some amino acids, and whey is ideal for meeting essential amino acid needs. Whey also supplies branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), and some research supports that they aid muscle recovery after hard workouts.

Casein

Compared with whey, casein is slower to digest, and results in a lower, yet more prolonged rise in blood amino acid levels, which may provide a particular advantage for body builders. At least one study supports that casein outshines whey in terms of promoting strength and lean body mass gains in people following a structured weight-training plan.

Rice

Rice protein is less likely to create allergic reactions than other proteins, and it comes from a plant, making it appropriate for vegetarians. Another potential advantage is that rice protein contains a high proportion of arginine, an amino acid that can dilate blood vessels, possibly enhancing blood flow to muscles. Rice is not a “complete” protein however; it doesn’t supply all of the essential amino acids. Some products combine rice protein with proteins from sources like soy or milk to make it complete.

Egg

Egg protein is ideal for people who are looking to build new muscle. It has a very high protein efficiency ratio (PER), which is one measure of how well our bodies can use any particular form of protein. The higher the PER, the more efficiently our bodies can use that protein when we eat it. Egg is off the charts in terms of PER. Egg protein also is a complete protein, and is a good source of essential and branched-chain amino acids. Egg protein powder is made from egg whites, and comes in a convenient, pasteurized powder form.

Soy

Soy protein is a high-quality plant protein that provides all essential amino acids, making it a good option for vegetarians. For the body to best utilize soy protein, vegetarians should also eat grain or dairy within a few days. Soy protein comes in two basic forms: soy protein isolate and soy protein concentrate. Soy protein isolate is the most highly purified form, and has a minimum protein content of 90%. Soy protein concentrate contains more carbohydrates, and has a protein content of approximately 70%. Concentrates tend to cost a little less, but if you find soy protein concentrate doesn’t agree with you, try isolate, which is easier for some people to digest.

How much?

With protein, as with many nutrients, more is not always better. According to Dr. Doug Paddon-Jones, Associate Professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch and Director of Exercise Studies, “30 grams of protein appears to stimulate maximum muscle synthesis. For athletes, each meal and snack is a chance to hit the 30 gram mark, giving your body several opportunities each day to maximize muscle growth and repair.”

Another reason to spread protein evenly through the day is simple efficiency. “Given that your body won’t use much beyond 30 grams of protein at a time, it doesn’t make sense to load up with more than this,” says Paddon-Jones.

When?

  • During breakfast. To support muscle building first thing in the morning, try trading traditional carb-heavy breakfast foods for more protein-rich options, such as a powder protein supplement mixed with milk and cereal.

  • Prior to a long strength-training session. Sipping a casein-based protein supplement prior to and during your workout will give muscles sustained access to amino acids. If taken in the evening, casein can provide a steady supply of amino acids while you're sleeping.

  • Immediately pre- or post-workout. Especially if your workout includes aerobic or circuit training, protein manufacturers recommend a whey protein-based liquid or powder supplement.

Suzanne Dixon, MPH, MS, RD, an author, speaker, and internationally recognized expert in chronic disease prevention, epidemiology, and nutrition, has taught medical, nursing, public health, and alternative medicine coursework. She has delivered over 150 invited lectures to health professionals and consumers and is the creator of a nutrition website acclaimed by the New York Times and Time magazine. Suzanne received her training in epidemiology and nutrition at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health at Ann Arbor.

Copyright © 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

7 reasons to prioritize protein

By the Aisle7 Medical Advisory

Even when protein deficiency isn't a problem, protein quality and quantity is often overlooked for everyday health. But protein isn't just important for the muscle-builders of the world. Take a look at just a few of the known impacts "protein power" appears to have on a wide range of complex health conditions:

  • A balanced diet featuring quality protein with each meal can help maintain steady energy all day.

  • Preliminary research has found that a high-protein diet may help keep weight off more effectively than a high-carb diet.

  • Some studies have suggested that protein, especially from plants, may help lower blood pressure.

  • A high-protein diet offers more control to women with a common hormonal syndrome known as polycystic ovary syndrome by providing a way to improve their health through day-to-day food choices. And...

  • ...as a bonus, the benefits of eating more protein and fewer carbohydrates—weight loss, blood sugar control, and reduction in abdominal fat—are all associated with better cardiovascular health.

  • In addition to its role in creating lean muscle, preliminary research suggests that whey protein is involved in the health of many body systems, such as liver and immune function. For people looking to supplement, many forms are widely available, including pea, rice, egg, and milk (casein). Note, however, that while egg and whey proteins are relatively complete, others, like rice, would need to be combined with other proteins to provide comparable nutrition.

  • Finally: protein, of course, is a mainstay of any weight-lifting program and can help your body preserve muscle from regular workouts.

Copyright © 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

Protein before bed may boost gains from strength training

By the Aisle7 Medical Advisory

Most people know that it’s important to consume enough protein when strength training. A new study now suggests, however, that when you take that protein may also be important, finding that protein consumption before sleep may increase strength and muscle mass. Published in the Journal of Nutrition, the study placed 44 young men (average age 22) on a resistance training program for 12 weeks. The participants all ate a relatively high-protein diet and received a protein snack immediately after exercising. However, researchers also divided the men into two groups: one group received a supplemental protein blend before sleep (27.5 g protein, 15 g carbohydrates, 0.1 g fat), while the other group received a placebo. By the end of the 12 weeks, here is what the researchers discovered:

  • The men receiving extra protein before sleep saw a significantly greater increase in strength, as well as a greater increase in leg muscle size, compared to the placebo group.

It is not clear whether the muscle gains in the new study came about simply because the protein group received more protein, or because the protein was consumed before sleep. In addition, the research was partially funded by the Dutch Olympic Committee as well as by DSM Food Specialties, the company that manufactured the protein supplement used in the study.

Source: Journal of Nutrition

Copyright © 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

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