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Nearly 1 in 5 moms have postpartum depression or anxiety

You’re not alone.* If you think you need support, we’re here to talk. Postpartum depression and anxiety are highly treatable. Schedule your no-cost counseling session today. Available in select locations.*

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Get the support you may need at no cost

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Get a no-cost counseling session with a trained, licensed therapist.

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Call or text "help" to the Postpartum Support International HelpLine.

 

Call 1-800-944-4773 (TTY: 711).

No-cost counseling

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We're here to talk. Schedule your no-cost counseling session.

With our mental health voucher, your first session is at no cost with a MinuteClinic® licensed therapist. Trained in treating postpartum and prenatal depression and anxiety by Postpartum Support International (PSI), our therapists are available in person and virtually, on evenings and weekends too.

Download the voucher and show it to your provider at the start of your visit to receive your session at no cost.

Postpartum Support International HelpLine

Call or text “help” to 1-800-944-4773

The Postpartum Support International HelpLine is available between 8 AM and 11 PM ET. If it is after hours, you can leave a confidential message and your call or text will be returned as soon as possible.

Call 1-800-944-4773 (TTY: 711)

If you or someone you know is experiencing a crisis, call or text the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988.

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We’re here to talk

about the feelings that overwhelm you,

the fatigue that fogs you,

the doubts that follow you.

Nearly 1 in 5 mothers develop postpartum depression or anxiety.*

We’re here to talk about

how you can pull through.

Schedule a no-cost counseling session** with MinuteClinic® at CVS®.

CVS is here to talk.

Because here, healthier happens together.

CVS®

Schedule your no-cost session* at CVS.com/PPD

*First session is free while supplies last. Patient can schedule subsequent visits with any in-network provider.

In collaboration with Postpartum Support International

Learn more about postpartum depression and anxiety

It’s not just the baby blues

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a medical condition that women can get before and after childbirth. While it may be mistaken for the baby blues, the symptoms of postpartum depression are more intense and last longer. Moms can be diagnosed with peripartum depression during pregnancy and postpartum depression up to one year after giving birth.

Postpartum depression symptoms are similar to depression, but may include:* 

  • Feeling distant from your baby 
  • Doubting your ability to care for your baby 
  • Thinking about hurting yourself or your baby 
Woman holding a crying baby while other children romp behind her.

Recognizing postpartum anxiety

Someone with postpartum anxiety can feel consumed with worry and constantly nervous or panicked about the safety and well-being of the baby. Postpartum anxiety can be experienced on its own, but sometimes moms can experience it in addition to depression. 

Postpartum anxiety symptoms during and after pregnancy might include:*

  • Constant worry, racing thoughts and inability to sit still
  • Disturbances of sleep and appetite
  • Physical symptoms like dizziness, hot flashes and nausea
Mother holding a fussy baby.

How to get the support you need:

Postpartum depression and anxiety are highly treatable. MinuteClinic® at CVS® offers mental health counseling and you can talk to a licensed therapist within one week.*  If needed, a licensed therapist can refer you to alternative or higher-level care. Alternative care may include medication management​.

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FAQs

Postpartum depression, or PPD, is depression that occurs after having a baby. Feelings of postpartum depression are more intense and last longer than those of “baby blues,” a term used to describe the worry, sadness and tiredness many women experience after having a baby. 

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Depression During and After Pregnancy. Accessed October 3, 2023. 

The symptoms of postpartum depression are similar to symptoms of depression but may also include:

Crying more often than usual

Feelings of anger

Withdrawing from loved ones

Feeling distant from your baby

Worrying or feeling overly anxious

Thinking about hurting yourself or your baby

Doubting your ability to care for your baby

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Depression During and After Pregnancy. Accessed October 3, 2023. 

Postpartum depression is highly treatable. Talk therapy, such as mental health counseling at MinuteClinic®, is also used to treat depression, often in combination with medications. 

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Depression During and After Pregnancy. Accessed October 3, 2023. 

Postpartum depression can occur up to 1 year after having a baby.

Source: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Postpartum Depression and Anxiety. Accessed October 3, 2023. 

Someone with PPA may experience extreme worries and fears, often over the health and safety of the baby. Some people have panic attacks and might feel shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, a feeling of losing control and numbness and tingling.

Source: Postpartum Support International, Anxiety During Postpartum and Pregnancy. Accessed October 3, 2023. 

The symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy or postpartum might include:

Constant worry

Feeling that something bad is going to happen

Racing thoughts

Disturbances of sleep and appetite

Inability to sit still

Physical symptoms like dizziness, hot flashes, and nausea

Source: Postpartum Support International, Anxiety During Postpartum and Pregnancy. Accessed October 3, 2023. 

Therapy is recommended to help treat anxiety. You also can consider medication, especially if anxiety has a big impact on your life or if therapy does not help on its own. Making time for self-care, joining support groups, and using community resources also can help with anxiety.

Source: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Postpartum Depression and Anxiety. Accessed October 3, 2023.

Anxiety can start at any time during or after pregnancy. It most often begins right after delivery and up to 6 weeks postpartum, though it may happen up to a year after delivery.

Source: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Postpartum Depression and Anxiety. Accessed October 3, 2023.

  • *FOR 1 IN 5 MOMS HAVE POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION OR ANXIETY. YOU’RE NOT ALONE: World Health Organization (WHO). Launch of the WHO guide for integration of perinatal mental health in maternal and child health services. Published September 19, 2022.

  • *FOR AVAILABLE IN SELECT STATES: Available in Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and South Carolina only.

  • *FOR POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS: Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Depression Among Women. Last reviewed May 22, 2023.

  • *FOR POSTPARTUM ANXIETY SYMPTOMS: Postpartum International Support (PSI). Anxiety During Pregnancy & Postpartum

  • *FOR SCHEDULING A SESSION WITHIN A WEEK: As of July 31, 2023, 87% of patients are able to book an appointment within a week. Appointment availability may vary.

  • *FOR MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING VOUCHER: Review voucher for eligibility details.